November 2010 – Another Revenue Measure Victory for Terrain

The Santa Barbara School District’s two bond measures received voter approval in Tuesday’s election, giving its elementary and secondary schools $110 million in combined funding for infrastructure improvements.

Measure Q, a $75 million general obligation bond for the secondary district, won handedly — 68.98 percent (33,401 votes) to 31.02 percent (15,023 votes). The elementary district’s Measure R, a $35 million bond, also secured a large lead, passing 70.85 percent (14,805 votes) to 29.15 percent (6,090 votes).

“We are very pleased to have so much community support for our school facilities,” Superintendent Brian Sarvis said in a news release issued Wednesday morning. “We have a number of shovel-ready projects, including the Santa Barbara High School kitchen and replacement of the portables at San Marcos High School with a permanent wing to house the Health Academy. In addition, we have a number of other projects that we will be able to apply for state approval.”

Deputy Superintendent Eric Smith has said that every effort will be made to keep tax rates at the same level.
Priority projects include renovating and maintaining facilities and grounds, with an emphasis on fixing up the district’s oldest buildings and replacing portables.

Steering committee co-chairs Mark Ingalls and Lynn Rodriguez of the Santa Barbara Education Foundation advocated the measures as timely, necessary initiatives to support local education and the community at large.
— Noozhawk staff writer Giana Magnoli can be reached at gmagnoli@noozhawk.com. Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @Noozhawk or @NoozhawkNews.

Election Results Wrap-Up
Santa Barbara Independent
Thursday, November 4, 2010
By Indy Staff
School Issues
Those anti-tax feelings did not hurt Measures Q and R, bonds for capital improvements at Santa Barbara’s public schools; both got around 70-percent support. Campaign consultant Brian Robinson chalked that up to a “team effort,” explaining, “If it wasn’t for the hard work that the teachers do for our kids, these wouldn’t have passed.”